Opportunities

Jobs

Internships

Education Centre “Cosmopolitan” Summer Internships in Novosibirsk and Altai Mountains
Education Centre “Cosmopolitan,” Novosibirsk, Russia, is pleased to announce that they are accepting applications for their summer internship programs that will run in Novosibirsk and in the Altai Mountains area. Internships are offered at the children’s camps which run from mid-June until mid-July 2020. These internship positions are open to university students and graduates. No previous teaching experience, no previous knowledge of Russian is required. Internships at the children’s summer camps comprise of teaching foreign languages and creativity workshops, working as camp leaders, etc. By participating in this internship program, you will gain valuable skills and experiences for future professions while being immersed in the Russian culture and having intensive practice in the Russian language.

Funding

Two PhD Positions at the Research Centre for East European Studies, University of Bremen
Mapping Uncertainties, Challenges and Future Opportunities of Emerging Markets: Informal Barriers, Business Environments and Future Trends in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia (MARKETS) funded by an MSCA grant of the European Union in the context of Horizon 2020 (Grant agreement no: 861034). Within MARKETS two PhD positions are available at the Research Centre for East European Studies (Forschungsstelle Osteuropa) at the University of Bremen deadline for applications: 10 July 2020, starting date for selected PhD students: 01 September 2020. Successful candidates will have to complete a PhD thesis related to one of the following two topics within the contract period of 3 years. Foreign corporations in the post-socialist region: adapting to, using, or resisting the business environment and legal culture in Russia and Central Asia. Objectives: Study the learning processes of foreign companies and the role of foreign business associations in the region on the basis of one or several case studies (preferably in the context of a mixed methods research design); collect new qualitative data and process existing quantitative data; contribute to debates on informality and business and to practical understanding of the region. Informal ways to deal with asymmetric shocks, foreign economic sanctions and/or hard currency shortage in relatively closed or de facto state-controlled economies or sectors. Objectives: Explore competition between state and economic actors dealing with currency exchange and/or import substitution policies in the context of closely controlled economic systems on the basis of one or several case studies (potentially in the context of a mixed methods research design); collect new data; contribute to debates on governance. The two selected candidates will get an employment contract for a period of three years at the Research Centre for East European Studies and will register as doctoral students with the University of Bremen. Prof Dr Heiko Pleines and Prof Dr Michael Rochlitz will act as prime supervisors. Each selected candidate will be seconded to the target region for data collection and will subsequently be seconded to a non-academic partner to gain a hands-on work experience on how research skills can be used beyond academia for the benefit of the governmental, private or international development sector.

Postdoctoral Fellowships Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program, Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program
If you are considering post-graduation prospects or are an early career scholar seeking to advance your career though international research and/or teaching, the Fulbright Program has fellowships to meet your needs. Postdoctoral and early career awards in Women Studies are available worldwide and do not require an institutional affiliation. Fulbright fellowships raise your academic profile and allow you to collaborate with scholars abroad while furthering your research and/or teaching interests. The program is accepting applications for the 2021-2022 academic year through September 15, 2020.

American Councils for International Education Title VIII Research Scholar Program
Provides full support for research in policy-relevant fields in Russia, Eurasia, and Eastern Europe. Fellowships include round-trip international travel; housing and living stipends; visa support; overseas health, accident, and evacuation insurance; archive access; and logistical support. Open to U.S. graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, and faculty.

Individuals interested in applying should check the program website for more information and access to the online application. Please note that all American Councils Title VIII Fellowship Programs must take place between June 1, 2021 and August 31, 2022. The application deadline for Title VIII fellowships is October 1, 2020. All application materials must be submitted by the application deadline.

American Councils Title VIII Combined Research and Language Training Program
Provides full support for research and individualized language instruction in Russia, Eurasia, and Eastern Europe. Fellowships include round-trip international travel; housing and living stipends; visa support; overseas health, accident, and evacuation insurance; archive access; logistical support; and up to 10 academic hours per week of language instruction. Open to U.S. graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, and faculty.

Individuals interested in applying should check the program website for more information and access to the online application. Please note that all American Councils Title VIII Fellowship Programs must take place between June 1, 2021 and August 31, 2022. The application deadline for Title VIII fellowships is October 1, 2020. All application materials must be submitted by the application deadline.

Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, 2021-2022 Fellowship: “Rethinking Premodern Jewish Legal Cultures”
The Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to open a call for applications for the first of two successive fellowship years devoted to Jews and the law. Jews have been closely associated with law since antiquity, developing a rich and complex legal tradition and participating variously in the legal cultures of the societies in which they have lived. Several leading universities are now home to centers for Jewish law, ancient to contemporary in focus, and the topic is drawing scholarly interest from well beyond the field of legal studies, including research in history, literature, philosophy, political theory, and gender studies, among others. The Katz Center is pleased to contribute to this growing and expansive topic over the course of two consecutive fellowship years devoted to exploring the connections between Jewish studies and legal thought, culture, and practice. During the first year of this cycle, the 2021-2022 academic year, the Center seeks to support scholars working on law as a dynamic feature of Jewish culture in premodern contexts, spanning from antiquity to the eighteenth century. The Katz Center invites applications that propose the study or framing of Jewish law or legal thinking within relevant historical contexts; that explore the relationship between law and other aspects of society or culture; that attend to questions of form, genre, and rhetoric; that investigate the institutions, practices, and actors that enact law; or that address related topics such as governance and/or crime. The vision for the year is of a fellowship community that advances an interdisciplinary and multi-dimensional approach to law and that bridges between Jewish law and other legal cultures.

With funding from the Israel Institute and in partnership with Penn’s Jewish Studies Program, the Katz Center is offering an additional opportunity for a teaching fellowship in 2021–2022 for Israeli scholars. The recipient will be a full participant in the Center’s fellowship program and will teach one undergraduate course per semester on an Israel-related subject. To be eligible for the Israel Institute/Katz Center fellowship applicants must be Israeli citizens with a PhD in a field or subject related to Israel and/or who is currently employed at an Israeli institution of higher learning or research center. Applicants to this fellowship are required to submit a sample syllabus along with a statement of past teaching experience and teaching style. Full information can be found at the link posted above. Applications are due October 12, 2020.

2021-22 Second Temple Judaism: The Challenge of Diversity Fellowship, University of Michigan – Ann Arbor, Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
The Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan provides residential fellowships for scholars to conduct research around an annual theme. Position offers pending final approval, we are currently accepting applications for the 2021-22 Theme Year, “Second Temple Judaism: The Challenge of Diversity.” Diversity of ethnicity, religion, social status, gender, age, and ability was as much a feature of the ancient Mediterranean world as it is in the present. We aim to explore the diversity of religious, cultural, and political life during the period of the Second Temple, from after the Babylonian Exile up to and including the Bar Kokhba Revolt.

The modern notion of Second Temple Judaism was originally shaped by Christian scholars who imagined it as the “intertestamental” period between the Old and the New Testaments, or as the “age of Jesus.” On the other hand, Jewish scholars were uncomfortable with the periodization, only gradually accepting the notion that a significant transition also occurred between “Biblical” and “Rabbinic” Judaism, or “from the Bible to the Mishnah.” Second Temple Judaism, however, is much more than just a combination of “proto-Rabbinic” and “proto-Christian” traditions. It was the seedbed for multiple, distinctive worldviews, as recorded by Josephus and attested by the Dead Sea Scrolls, the so-called OT Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, the New Testament, and the rich literature of Hellenistic Judaism.

The Frankel Institute aims to develop fruitful conversation about ancient Jewish diversity. We invite fellows to question the separation of the “canonical” from the “non-canonical,” and the “Christian” from the “Jewish.” We particularly welcome proposals that integrate the “traditional” tools of philology, intellectual and social history, and archaeology with “newer” methods of analysis (gender studies, post-colonial studies, etc.). By bringing together a group of international scholars who approach the material from different perspectives in an interdisciplinary and inclusive fashion, the Frankel Institute seeks to contribute to our understanding of the vibrant diversity of Second Temple Judaism and redefine its place within Jewish Studies.

Application closing date is October 19, 2020.

Lysiak-Rudnytsky Ukrainian Studies Programme
The Lysiak-Rudnytsky Ukrainian Studies Programme is an annual program of the Ukrainian Institute’s Academic Sector. It welcomes project proposals from educational institutions, think tanks, and research centers that focus on the history and culture of Ukraine. The Lysiak-Rudnytskyi Ukrainian Studies Programme is designed to increase the visibility of Ukraine in educational, research, and cultural centers in Europe and North America. The goal of the Lysiak-Rudnytsky Programme is to:  Support the projects in Ukrainian Studies;  Strengthen Ukrainian perspectives in public discourse;  Promote Ukraine and its cultural heritage. In 2020, the Ukrainian Institute announces the first open call of the programme. We plan to announce open call annually. Institutions that operate in cultural, educational, or scientific sphere outside of Ukraine (universities, think tanks, research centers, NGOs and others) are eligible to apply. One applicant has the right to submit no more than two applications. Ukrainian institutions (residents of Ukraine) cannot apply for the Programme. The Ukrainian Institute welcomes the cooperation between Ukrainian institutions and foreign ones, but only the foreign institution can apply for the Programme. To apply for the Programme please send your application with the required documents to academic@ui.org.ua with the subject line ‘Project_Name_Proposal_Lysiak-Rudnytsky_Programme’.

Conferences & Workshops

Call for Proposals: 2021 Annual Conference, Society of Jewish Ethics
The next meeting of the Society of Jewish Ethics will be held remotely January 7-10, 2021. The deadline to submit proposals is Wednesday July 15, 2020. Proposals dealing with any aspect of Jewish ethics—theoretical or applied, classical or contemporary—are welcome. We seek proposals on any topic, including projects that utilize philosophical, historical, social scientific, cultural studies, literary, or critical theoretical approaches to matters of Jewish ethics. We welcome proposals addressing issues such as sexual ethics (especially in the context of #metoo), criminal justice (with a focus on racialization and mass incarceration), bioethics and health policy, economic justice and business ethics, environmental ethics, ethics and law, animal ethics, the rabbinate and power, as well as the relationship between Jews and the Genocides of Others.

This year, we are particularly interested in presentations dealing with issues related to the coronavirus pandemic or the 2020 election. What specific responsibilities do ethicists and teachers have in these areas? What concerns or perspectives do Judaism and Jewish ethics bring to these issues? What values shape Jewish individual and communal responses to the situation, and how are they deliberated?
Presentations might also include innovative syllabi in ethics-related disciplines. We are also interested in presentations that highlight activism, for example, the role of Jewish ethicists as activists and consultants, or the intersection of the study of Jewish ethics and activist practice. Panel proposals involving members of the Society of Christian Ethics and Society for the Study of Muslim Ethics are welcome.

This year we are requesting proposals for individual papers, panels, and creative offerings that may be possible in the context of a virtual conference. We welcome proposals for papers to be either presented in a virtual session or pre-circulated and discussed during a virtual session. All proposals should include: a tentative title, an abstract (500-700 words), an abbreviated abstract of 100 words to appear in the conference program (this can be revised later), a selected bibliography, and the contact information of the presenter (name, institutional affiliation, phone number, and e-mail address). Panel proposals should include this contact information for all participants. All papers are reviewed anonymously.

We encourage authors to submit their completed papers for publication in the Journal of Jewish Ethics. All presenters must become members of the SJE.

Call for Submissions: 2020 AWSS Graduate Research Prize
The Association for Women in Slavic Studies (AWSS) Graduate Research Prize is awarded annually to fund promising graduate-level research in any field of Slavic/East European/Central Asian studies by a woman or on a topic in Women’s or Gender Studies related to Slavic Studies/East Europe/Central Asia by a scholar of any gender. Graduate students who are at any stage of master’s or doctoral level research are eligible. Only current graduate students are eligible for this prize.The grant can be used to support expenses related to completion of a thesis or dissertation, as well as travel, services, and/or materials. The award carries a cash prize of $1000.00. Nominations and self- nominations are welcome.A completed application consists of 1) a 2-3 page proposal that explains the project, how the funds will be used, and why this funding is necessary for continued progress on the project; 2) a CV; 3) a detailed budget and timeline; and 4) two letters of recommendation. Please submit application materials in MS Word or PDF. Winning recipients should submit a report on their use of the funds to the Committee Chair by August of the year following the receipt of the award. Recipients must be members of AWSS; if award recipients are not current AWSS members, they must join AWSS as condition of the award.Applications are due by September 1, 2020, and must be complete by that date to be considered for the award. Letters of recommendation should be forwarded to the AWSS Graduate Prize Committee Chair directly.

Please direct all questions and send all application materials by email attachment to the Committee Chair, Sharon Kowalsky, Associate Professor of History, Texas A&M-Commerce: Sharon.Kowalsky@tamuc.edu.

Summer/ language Opportunities

Harvard University Virtual Summer Introductory Czech Course
Harvard University is offering an intensive Introductory Czech course this summer. The course will be taught interactively via Zoom from June 20 to August 8, 2020, and is open to both Harvard and other students. The course satisfies the FLAS contact hours requirement.

The 7-weeks (5 days per week) intensive course (8 credits) provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Czech language and culture for those who would like to speak Czech or use the language for reading and research. Designed for students without any previous knowledge of Czech, the course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing). Students are introduced to Czech culture through readings, screenings, and class discussions. This course prepares students to continue in Czech at the intermediate level or for study and travel abroad in the Czech Republic. For more information, see link posted above.

The University of Pittsburgh’s Slavic, East European, and Near Eastern Summer Language Institute
The University of Pittsburgh’s Slavic, East European, and Near Eastern Summer Language Institute offers a focus on critical and less commonly taught languages through proficiency-based instruction through courses in Arabic, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Bulgarian, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Slovak, Turkish, and Ukrainian. Whether students choose to study on Pitt’s campus or on one of the SLI’s many study abroad programs, they can expect to cover approximately one academic year’s worth of course work during a single summer. For full information, click here.

American Councils Balkan Language Initiative (BLI)
Intensive language instruction opportunities available for fall, spring, academic year, or summer terms for the following languages and locations: Albanian in Tirana, Albania; Bosnian in Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina; Bulgarian in Sofia, Bulgaria; Macedonian in Skopje, Macedonia; Serbian in Belgrade, Serbia; Serbian in Podgorica, Montenegro.

For more information on the various programs, click here.
Application deadlines are as follows:
Summer programs: February 15
Fall & academic year: March 15

Spring semester: October 15

American Councils Eurasian Regional Language Program (ERLP)
ERLP provides high-quality language instruction, specially designed cultural programs, and expert logistical support to participants studying the languages of Central Asia, the South Caucasus, Russia, Ukraine, and Moldova.
The following languages and locations are currently offered: Yerevan, Armenia (Armenian); Baku, Azerbaijan (Azerbaijani, Turkish); Tbilisi, Georgia (Chechen, Georgian); Almaty, Kazakhstan (Kazakh); Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan (Kyrgyz); Chisinau, Moldova (Romanian); locations throughout Russia (Bashkir, Buryat, Tatar, Yakut); Dushanbe, Tajikistan (Pashto, Persian (Dari, Farsi, Tajiki), Uzbek); and Kiev, Ukraine (Ukrainian).
For more detailed information, click here.
Application deadlines are as follows:
Summer programs: February 15
Fall & academic year: March 15

Spring semester: October 15

American Home in Vladimir, Russia Intensive Russian Program
Tailored intensive Russian language programs are available through American Home in Vladimir, Russia. Applications are accepted all year, with the possibility of selecting your own dates and lengths of the program. Cost includes room and board with a Russian family (two meals a day); well-educated native speakers trained to teach Russian to foreigners; intensive, one-on-one or small group lessons three hours a day, five days a week; lessons conducted on the trolley bus, in an open air market, and elsewhere in the community; and classroom lessons in the comfortable, well-equipped American Home where you will also meet Russians studying English.
For detailed cost information and application details, please see site linked above.
Aspirantum-Armenian School of Languages and Cultures is inviting students, scholars and researchers to apply and take part in Russian language summer school to be organized from July 5 until July 25, 2020 in Yerevan, Armenia.
Aspirantum is also organizing summer and winter schools of Persian, Armenian and Russian languages in Yerevan, Armenia.
The 21 days Russian language summer school 2020 offers participants to master skills in written and oral modern Russian, reading and interpreting Russian texts from different periods as well as rapidly deepening their knowledge in colloquial Russian.

To apply, click here.

Ukrainian Catholic University- School of Ukrainian Language Summer Program (Online)
The UCU program is the largest and most popular Ukrainian-as-a-foreign-language program in Ukraine, hosting about a hundred students from over twenty countries every summer. The program consists of daily language classes, individual tutoring, workshops or lectures and excursions. At the beginning of the summer UCU program, students visit the Carpathian Mountains for a unique two-week experience. Students then return to Lviv for four weeks to continue the UCU summer language and culture program. University ECTS credits can be received on completion of the course. The Summer Program consists of six weeks. Sessions are customizable to meet student criteria and requirements, where students may choose any number of days or weeks of study during the six weeks.